Overview

The publicly and privately-owned solar panels in Springfield, generate clean, renewable, pollution-free electricity using the power of the sun. Here, we are looking at the estimated amount of electricity all of Springfield’s solar panels should produce under perfect conditions.

kWh

Kilowatt Hours

A kilowatt hour (kWh) is a measure of electrical energy equal to using 1,000 watts for 1 hour. You can learn more about kWh here.

Our Data & Goals
  • 30,001,032 kWh

     

    2017

    Baseline
  • 116,855,534 kWh

     

    2022

    Goal
Our Data & Goals
2017

Baseline

30,001,032kWh

 
2022

Goal

116,855,534kWh

 
Charts & Graphs

What Does this Graph Show Us?

The blue dot in this line graph is showing the total amount of kWhs that the current solar panels installed throughout Springfield are expected to produce today. The yellow dot shows the amount of solar we expect our Springfield community to be producing in 2022. As you can see, we are hoping our community as a whole continues to add solar panels!

What Does this Chart Show Us?

The pie chart at the left is looking at the total number of systems installed in the city. We have broken the numbers out to show that the residential section has by far the largest number of installed solar systems.

What Does this Chart Show Us?

This pie chart breaks down the solar in the city based on the output- or the amount of kWhs we anticipate from each. While the residential sector has the largest number of solar installations, as expected, each of these systems is smaller and therefore provide only 28% of the total kWhs from solar. The commercial sector covers more than half of the total solar with a total estimated kWh production at 17,817,311. The City Government only has 5 systems installed, but they are large and produce a total estimated kWh production of 3,688,922, which averages to 737,734 kWh per system.  The largest per system average of all the sectors.

View Our Sources Here

Strategies to Increase the Number of Solar Panels in Springfield

Through the Climate Action and Resilience Plan (CARP), the following strategies were identified to increase the use of solar throughout Springfield.

  1. Identify a solar expert ‘point person’ in the City to provide technical assistance and guidance to residents and other property owners.
  2. Mayor and City Council should pass a resolution stating support for solar goals and strategies.
  3. Launch an educational campaign sponsored by a resident-led group to explain solar options and financing.
  4. Adopt City incentives to achieve stated goals.
  5. Host a community solar development program and support the development of a local socially equitable tax equity fund to achieve the goals for community solar.
  6. Support community shared solar projects—with 50% LMI buy-in per project.
  7. Research the feasibility of adopting an ordinance requiring all new and major renovations to include solar or be able to accommodate solar.
  8. Send experts and City staff/residents to participate in statewide discussions on behalf of resident and local business needs with respect to solar and other renewable energy sources.
  9. Host a group purchasing program for solar, eg MA Solarize.
  10. Facilitate a working group of ‘solar champions’ with neighborhood council/civic associations involvement to promote solar to residents.

 

How You Can Help

Recent Updates for Springfield
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Recently the City of Springfield released its Climate Action Resilience Plan for to reduce the city’s greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 and to make the city more resilient.

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